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April 19 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Checklist of things you should look for when choosing your solar company

Original Article here http://energis.com.au/checklist-things-look-choosing-solar-company/
----------------------
http://energis.com.au/research-your-manufacturer-before-you-buy-solar-panels-2/
You’ve decided to take the step and switch to solar. Fantastic! You’ve decided on the system size and components you want (or not yet) and are now looking for a reliable Solar Company to achieve your project. There are many solar installers and retailers in the market, but not all companies are equivalent. Going solar is a long-term investment and it is important to choose a reliable company and avoid the dodgy ones.
To keep the troubles away, here is a checklist of things you should look for before choosing your solar company:
Accreditation
The first and the most important aspect is to ensure the company is accredited by the Australian Clean Energy Council. This aspect is even more important knowing you may not be eligible for the government incentives if you don’t deal with CEC approved companies.The CEC is the peak body for the clean energy industry in Australia and represents leading businesses operating in solar and other renewable energy systems. The Clean Energy Council ensures the quality, safety and reliability of Australia’s solar industry by maintaining the product and service standards. The CEC regulates the accreditations for solar installers, designers and retailers. Buying from a CEC Approved organisation assured that the company is committed to the industry best practices.
Solar Panel Quality
Make sure that the company you choose works with respected manufactures and top-quality panel and inverter brands. Prefer a solar company that supplies from the first tier. Tier 1 label offer high-quality standards that have proven to be better and more bankable than the rest of the market.
Price
If the price is a very important aspect, it shouldn’t be your main deciding factor. Beware of extra cheap quotes. Make sure the quotations include every cost: installation, connection, service and maintenance. A reliable company will provide you with a transparent and comprehensive quotation, highlighting how much energy the system is expected to generate and the equivalent expected savings.
Warranties
Warranty is a crucial aspect. Make sure all the components of your system carry a warranty.
The panels carry 2 warranties, the performance warranty and the product warranty. Panels performance warranty covers the natural degradation of the solar cells and should be 25 years. Panels product warranty is provided by the manufacturer and should be 10 years minimum. It covers you against manufacturing defects and problems.
Inverters warranty should be at least 5 years, preferably 10 years. If it isn’t, you can (and you should) extend the warranty to 10 years.
Read the warranty conditions and check if the warranty offers a “replacement” warranty. It is also important to know who cover your warranty and who will cover the cost of shipping back to the manufacturer in case of malfunction.
Experience and testimonials
Read about the company. Testimonials are an effective way to determine if a company has completed their promises and provide customers satisfaction.
Look up how many years the company has been on the market and their big projects. It is also an indicator of success and trustability.
Energis tick all these boxes. Founded in 2009, Energis has been in the market for 9 years, installing projects all around Victoria. Check our solar installations here and our testimonials here.
Energis is a CEC Approved Solar Retailer and prove its committed to the industry best practices, working with Tier 1 solar manufacturers with locally backed warranties at an affordable price.
Call Energis today on 1300 782 217, or send us an enquiry.

March 17 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Proper Asbestos Removal In Tasmania

ASBESTOS has been discovered in children's crayons adorned with standard animated characters Peppa Pig, Dora the Explorer and Mickey Mouse.
Most of these regulations and requirements also apply to self employed individuals, property managers and business property house owners. Lung most cancers might not develop till many years or more after exposure, and is more likely to develop in people who smoke and people with asbestosis. But a 3rd wave of asbestos-related diseases was appearing in individuals who had been concerned in repairing, renovating or demolishing buildings containing asbestos.
Regulations 454 (have to be taken if an emergency occurs at a office) and 455 (a domestic premises) specify the actions taken relating to a construction or plant at the workplace or premises that should be demolished as well as asbestos that's fastened to or put in in the structure or plant. These actions include giving rapid written notice to Comcare in regards to the emergency, earlier than the demolition commences.

The well being dangers of asbestos at the moment are well-known and properly publicised, notably in Australia. Breathing in asbestos fibres for a prolonged time period might trigger plenty of ailments, together with asbestosis, lung most cancers, mesothelioma and other non-cancerous illnesses of the lungs. The danger of developing an illness from asbestos increases with the number of exposures a person has with asbestos fibres, particularly when those exposures are in areas that have a high concentration of fibres in the air.
Bullying is repeated unreasonable behaviour directed towards a employee or a personnel. In most instances that poses a danger well being and security. If you want to avoid going to courtroom, Slater and Gordon's asbestos lawyers will in fact try to negotiate a settlement for you, nevertheless we are unable to ensure that your asbestos claim is not going to proceed to trial. And, of course, some individuals want their case to go to trial. Relevant references: The program aligns with Safe Work Australia Code of Practice ‘How to manage and work health and safety risks'.
The NSW free-fill asbestos taskforce forums in Albury and Holbrook this week raised community questions concerning the Victorian Government's response to this situation. I am writing to thank Zero ASBESTOS for your recent donation to the Mountain Creek State High School. Your sort donation was used as a prize and we attracted over a hundred individuals to our profitable fundraising evening.worksafe victoria asbestos licence
Despite the bans, residents stay in danger for mesothelioma due to older building, residential and industrial buildings. Older structures contain asbestos cement and other asbestos merchandise. Demolition of any buildings constructed prior to the asbestos bans is especially harmful, as is any renovation or transforming project that places individuals involved with these areas or products.
Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

March 04 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
mould inspection NSW
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
indoor air quality testing
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
noise survey
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
SESA
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
safety consultants
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html

February 24 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Asbestos Register
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
https://www.sesa.com.au/asbestos-surveys.html
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html

February 18 2018

GonzalesClancy9

How To Develop Strong Roses

http://www.thetutuguru.com.au/garden-info/plant-factsheets/canary-island-date-palm/

The Right Way To Develop Healthy Roses

Everyone knows that taking care of the roses is not such an uncomplicated task. While some species can be challenging to grow, there are a few that even a beginner can handle. Listed here are some tips on growing roses.

1) Cut the stalk once you see small red bumps appear. Those red bumps will grow into all new branches at a later stage.

2) Remove any aged and washed out stems and keep only the ones that are healthy. A lot of these are often the width of a pen.

3) Generate tiny cuts on the bottom of the bulb. This will undoubtedly change the appearance of your rose as it will improve the odds that it will grow up straight.

4) Your plants need nutrients so use fertilizers to give that to them. Roses need extra attention and nutrition every day. On the list of simplest approaches is to buy fertilizer that is released gradually. You can also use liquid fertilizer once per month to help keep your roses healthy. Roses must have enough water if they are to thrive. Should you be staying in an area where there is diminished rain, you can also think about installing a watering system.                                                                    

5) To make a clean cut, never forget to use sharpened garden shears. When your stems are larger than about 1.5 centimeters you should use bigger garden shears as you do not want to have a messy cut. But remember, even though your rose is developing too much, always cut it with great care.

6) To protect your flowers against the strong rays of the sun, cover them while still ensuring that they get partial sunlight. This will additionally make certain that the soil stays wet for longer. Apply a 5 centimeter layer of fertilizer for ideal results. If the temperatures are extremely low, blanket the foot of the stem with a few centimeters of soil and try to cover the whole plant with a protective foil to make sure it doesn't die.

7) When it comes to dead heads, you will have to trim them to promote the growth of new buds The month of July is excellent for growing roses but don't forget that you can still keep your precious roses strong during the other months of the year. If the rose has problems or it is assaulted by insects, you will want to clear up this problem as soon as possible. Try to eliminate the afflicted portion first and clean the plant carefully. If the bugs and diseases are getting out of hand, arm yourself with some rose poison and get rid of them the nasty way.

8) Natural poison will not cause problems for other plants or even yourself. Take the time to study the steps for the effective application of the poison. Making the mistake of putting on too little or too much poison can be avoided by reading the instructions. Stop giving your flowers fertilizer at the start of Autumn. When you continue to fertilize them, they will sprout too early and will ultimately die in the frigid months that follow.

February 17 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
Asbestos Clearance Certificate NSW
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html

February 15 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Safety & Environmental Services Australia
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Success Strategies for Home Improvement Projects

Springtime is one of the best times to do home improvement on the exterior of your property. Get outside as soon as you can when the weather turns warm to start your summer repairs. Days with high humidity should probably be avoided, especially if the work you have to do is very laborious. A great looking lawn that is landscaped to perfection is the envy of all of your neighbors once it is complete. Don't worry because most of the time there is just a few hours of work to do. Working as hard and fast as possible will allow you to have more time to relax in your perfectly landscaped yard.
Installing new interior doors can do a lot to transform the look of your home. With the right style of doors, you can increase the beauty of your home. So if you plan to remodel your kitchen, think ahead and choose a door that will look great. For bedroom doors, explore the different materials that can provide more privacy. We are talking about heavier duty doors that will prevent sound from escaping. You can find doors that help maintain the quiet in the sleeping areas and they don't have to be completely sound proof. There is nothing so daunting as painting the exterior of a house. We know that very many homes now have plastic siding on them, or aluminum for that matter. But there are still lots of homes that can use a fresh coat of paint. I must tell you that you need to use paint that's most appropriate in regards to your weather conditions. You really don't want to end up using a paint that can't resist heat if you live in a hot place. Taking into consideration the cold weather is also important. Therefore you should talk to the people you're buying you paint from to make sure that it's the right stuff.
timber doors
If you really want an in ground swimming pool, be sure you know what you're doing before you proceed. Pool installation professionals should really be used unless you are skilled at installing one yourself. It is always good to talk with neighbors or friends that have had this done and ask them what their experience was with their company. By investing a lot of money now in your in ground swimming pool, you will reap the benefits later should you decide to sell your home. Be sure you have researched the company that you choose thoroughly before hiring them to do this job. Home improvement projects is a great way to bring family members together. You can work on your house as a team and get satisfaction from a job well done. But it's also important to always work safely, no matter how small your job is.

February 13 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
https://www.sesa.com.au/asbestos-inspections-sydney.html
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Raise The Value Of Your Home With These Tips

Home improvement projects take a lot of effort to begin, whether you have a lot of knowledge and skill or not. You shouldn't be persuaded by the home improvement stuff you see on TV. There is more to home improvement than really big jobs. This article provides you some great ideas.
If you have an older home, you may find that there are hardwood floors underneath any carpeting currently installed. Many homes prior to 1950s were required to have hard wood as their sub-floor. This means that there may be gold in those floorboards. They may need some refinishing, but not having to pay to have them installed would be a huge money saver.
If you don't already have some, install some ceiling fans in all your rooms. You can use these to cool rooms and circulate the air, reducing the need to use your air conditioning unit. This in turn will save you money on your electric bill and most likely increase the life expectancy of your air conditioner.
Always insist on references before hiring a contractor to work on your home improvement project. Make sure your potential contractor is properly licensed to perform the work in question. Hiring a professional is worth the money to give you peace of mind that the job is done right the first time.
decking Perth
If you are a handy person and can understand plans, consider doing some home improvement jobs yourself. Small and simple projects can improve the overall look of your home. By doing it yourself, you save money and avoid the aggravation of researching a contractor for minor jobs. You will feel more confident and much prouder of your home.
Brighten up your kitchen or bathroom with a mosaic backsplash. Backsplashes serve two purposes: they are both utilitarian and a style element. Most people use regular square tile clay for their backsplash, but a mosaic design creates interest and allows you to express your personality. Fortunately, you can buy mosaic tiles on a mesh sheet, saving the time that it would take to lay each tile individually. This provides you with an intricate pattern without having to cut any tile, which can be tricky.
Put a ring on your power tool plugs! To keep small children from plugging these potentially dangerous tools into a power outlet, just slip a key ring through the holes on the tips of the plug prongs. For bigger plugs you can even use s small padlock to safeguard the tools against potentially hazardous use.
Improve your front entrance curb appeal by adding oversized house numbers and a large size light fixture. Making your entrance eye catching and appealing will increase the value of your home and the homes around you. If your neighbors like your improvements, they may try it themselves and increase the value of the whole neighborhood.
For a personalized and one-of-a-kind wall covering, consider designing and ordering your own customized wallpaper online or through a local design studio. New websites offer a variety of options for wallpaper design, including enlarged photographs, murals, or even your children's artwork delivered to your door in a matter of weeks.
While major home improvements can grow very expensive, homeowners should avoid taking home loans to fund renovations unless it is absolutely necessary. Unless the renovations in question are needed immediately to prevent damage or make a house fit for sale, it is better to let them wait. Funding home improvement work from savings or investments is far superior to funding it through debt.
We have a home which is over 100 years old and updating it has been an ongoing process over the past five years. We have a new dining room, two new bathrooms and half of a new kitchen. Recently, my husband installed four new windows and put new siding on half of the house. I can't wait for the whole thing to be done!

February 12 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
https://www.sesa.com.au/occupational-hygiene-consultants-qualified-occupational-hygienists-sydney-nsw-act.html
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html

February 09 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
asbestos testing Sydney
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html
GonzalesClancy9

Get A Color That Can Add Spice To Your Back Deck

Everyone would like to have their house look nice, and with a little ingenuity and elbow grease, you can do it easily. Outdoors decking or patios can often be perked up using just dabs of color here and there. Truly being adventurous and acquiring a few strikingly designed items for your outdoor deck area will start to spice it up. Even second-hand pieces can look new after some effort and creativity. The rest of this post is going to explain to you even more ways to pep up your outside deck or patio.
Nothing you do will help, if your deck needs painting, so the first thing you should do is power wash it, and then give it a new coat of paint or stain. Use your imagination to create a good color structure. For example, you might paint the deck borders one color and then ideally, use a contrasting color on the uprights. Utilizing your imagination you can spice it up any way you want. An outside deck must look appealing for when you are expecting friends round. Furniture that matches the all around color design of your deck layout looks very pleasing. One of your patio corners are going to be made more interesting if it has a bar cart and glassware which are brightly colored.
Possibly outdated wicker chairs and tables might be brought to life with color matched paint and used on your deck. Even better, you could get really creative and try painting a style using acryllic paint that can be top-coated with protective varnish. For any individual touch it is possible to custom paint your own personal design onto the side of a galvanized bucket oblong or container to use as an ice bucket to chill drinks etc. Make sure your paint is really a food safe grade if you decide to customize your own ice bucket. Make use of natural objects and settings to inspire your patterns and colors, for instance a seaside theme with pale blues, yellows and greens is eye catching. Color a slatted table top with the help of two to three different shades. The palette of colors is entirely up to you so be free and creative!
5 star decking
As long as you're spicing up your patio or deck area, why don't you make other things more decorative like window boxes, garden sheds and porches? You can include lighting that is fun and exciting to illuminate your patio area. Drooping trees or beams are often spots for strings of lights or colorful lanterns. A coating of special paint could very well be applied to any regular white viny furniture you may have to coordinate it with your patio or deck colors. New seat covers on your newly painted vinyl chairs will certainly complete that renewed look. Picking your colors meticulously before you begin to get the overall look right is very important. The resulting colors can be subtle or or exuberant depending on what your vision and tastes are. Remember to get stirred from other people's work to bring your backyard to life.

February 08 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Office / Indoor Air Quality – Investigating IAQ Complaints

The air quality of the indoor environment such as a non-industrial office environment can significantly affect the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants.
Indoor air quality (IAQ) in the workplace, such an office environment, is the subject of much attention recently, and for good reason. Although serious irreversible health problems related to IAQ in non-industrial office environments are rare, the perception of endangered health is increasingly common among building occupants.
To date, the causes and consequences of poor IAQ are complex and not completely understood, but there are some basic factors that in many cases address IAQ concerns.
IAQ is a problem when the air contains dust and objectionable odours, chemical contaminants, dampness, mould or bacteria.
Poor indoor air quality can lead to a number of physical symptoms and complaints. The most common of these include:
Thermal discomfort: too hot or too cold
Headaches
Fatigue
Shortness of breath (eg. insufficient oxygen related to high carbon dioxide levels)
Sinus congestion
Coughs
Sneezing
Eye, nose, and throat irritation
Skin irritation
Dizziness
Nausea
Skin irritation
These physical symptoms and complaints are often attributed to indoor air quality, however, it is important to note that indoor air quality is not always the cause. Other factors in the indoor environment such as noise, overcrowding, improper lighting, poor ergonomic conditions, and job stress can also lead to these symptoms and complaints. In many situations, a combination of factors is to blame.
SESA
An increased likelihood of complaints is usually associated with factors such as the installation of new furnishings, uncontrolled renovation activities, poor air circulation and air flow, persistent moisture and ongoing low relative humidity. Complaints may also increase when there is a stressful work environment, such as impending layoffs, a great deal of overtime, or an ongoing conflict among staff members and management.
A number of factors can affect the indoor air quality of a building or facility, including:
The physical layout of the building
The building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system
The outdoor climate
The people who occupy the building
Contaminants emitted inside and entered from outside the building
Poor indoor air quality and indoor air contaminants affect some people more seriously, including:
People with allergies or asthma
People with respiratory disease
People whose immune system is suppressed as a result of disease or treatment
People who wear contact lenses
Indoor air contaminants can originate within a building or be drawn in from outdoors. These contaminants can lead to indoor air quality problems, even if the HVAC system is well designed, regularly maintained, and functioning to its optimum conditions.
Sources of contaminants inside the building environment may include:
Dust, dirt, or mould in the HVAC system (eg. cooling coils, ducts, registers)
Office equipment such as laser printers and copiers (eg. airborne particulates, ozone)
Personal activities such as smoking or cooking (eg. Volatile organic compounds, nicotine)
Housekeeping activities such as cleaning and dusting
Maintenance activities such as painting (eg. Volatile organic compounds)
Spills of water or other liquids
Special use areas such as print shops and laboratories
Industrial processes such as dry cleaning
Moisture affected building materials (eg. mould and bacteria)
Sources of contaminants from outside the building may include:
Vehicle exhaust
Pollen and dust (eg. long term build up if cleaning regime is inadequate)
Smoke
Unsanitary debris or dumpsters near the outdoor air intake
Depending on the complaint reported by building occupants, an indoor air quality investigation should include the following:
Interview with building occupants to identify potential causes such as identifiable odours, recent changes that may have caused the issue, water intrusion event, increased occupancy, cleaning regime, etc.
Assessment of the ventilation rate (generally when the indoor carbon dioxide levels are over 650 parts per million (ppm) above ambient outdoor levels)
Walkthrough inspection of the building and the ventilation system (filters, cooling coils, condensation trays, air ducts, etc.)
Sampling for airborne contaminants suspected to be present in concentrations associated with the reported complaints.
Documenting the complaint, the investigation, and any actions taken.
Occupant concerns regarding indoor air quality should be taken seriously and responded to as soon as possible. Initial information should be collected, checked and verified, preferably through interviews with occupants and a visual inspection:
Details about the specific complaint
Location(s) of the building where similar concerns about IAQ have been reported
Time of occurrence of the IAQ problem
When and where did it start and what has changed in the building just before the problem was first experienced
People affected and extent of the affected area(s)
Specific details on the health effects or discomfort occupants are experiencing
If the health effects stop soon after leaving the building, or over the weekend
If the symptoms have been diagnosed by a medical practitioner
If there are any identifiable practices inside or outside the building occurring at a time coinciding with the reported issues
If the air conditioning contractor or the building engineer evaluated the HVAC system or other conditions and the conclusions reached
Once the information above is gathered and analysed the walkthrough inspection by a specialist indoor air quality consultant should be undertaken to identify potential sources of contamination or unusual conditions. Generally, at this stage the IAQ consultant should be able to narrow the possibilities and developing air sampling strategy if required to confirm potential causes of the IAQ problem and decide on suitable solutions or if further investigation is required.
Generally, most IAQ issues can be resolved by addressing maintenance issues of the HVAC system (eg. air exchange rates, improved ventilation and air flow, filter change and disinfection of the internal surfaces of the air handling unit and the air ducts), HEPA vacuuming of the entire space, building repairs, addressing moisture issues, removing potential sources of contamination, implementing a new cleaning regime).
Under the Work Health & Safety Legislation, it is the duty of the person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) to provide a work environment that is free from risks to health and safety.
If you require assistance regarding the indoor air quality at your workplace please contact SESA on 02 8786 1808
First posted here https://www.sesa.com.au/14-indoor-air-quality/office-indoor-air-quality-investigating-iaq-complaints.html

January 25 2018

GonzalesClancy9

Tips And Tricks On Planning Your Special Wedding Day

Planning a wedding can be one of the most complicated, stressful events of a couple's life together. There can be hundreds of details to perfect and decisions to make, even with the simplest ceremony. Here are some tips and tricks to ensure that your wedding is as stress-free and as happy as possible.
When you are getting married, ask for help from family and friends, especially those who have gone through the wedding process before. They will help to offer you exceptional advice, as they have the experience that is necessary to give input on your decision. Tap into the heads of your loved ones for sound information.
Make sure you get a list of references from every single vendor you secure. If they're not willing to give you one, move on to someone else. You should get a long and varied list of people who speak highly of the person or company you've chosen so that you can feel secure in your choice.
Pick your wedding date to be at a memorable time in your life. For example, Valentine's Day is a romantic time to get married and is also an easy date to remember. A birthday or other anniversary is also an excellent choice. This will make remembering the date easier if either of you are very forgetful! It can also give you a theme to work with like hearts or birthday candles.
If you want to minimize the stress that you have on the days leading up to your wedding, hire a wedding planner. This person will be able to make sure that everything runs smoothly and that time management is taken care of. Hiring a wedding planner can be expensive but it can make a huge difference to your stress levels, as well as to the overall quality of the wedding day.
Try to buy your best man or maid of honor a gift to show your appreciation for helping to make your wedding day a good one. This will make them feel honored for being part of your special day. Purchase the gift way before the wedding so you do not forget to do so with all the craziness of your big day.
It is important that you find out how many people can fit into the venue where you are going to have your wedding reception. Many times, people pick a venue that does not have enough room for all of their guests, which then creates an array of unnecessary problems. Also, do not forget how many hours that you have rented the venue for.
It's important to research the laws in the location you've chosen for a destination wedding before you get there. They may have a curfew, or rules about alcohol consumption, or even licenses that you need to buy for photography or alcohol sales. Check with a local wedding planner for assistance.
DJ
One of the most awkward moments at a wedding can be the bouquet toss. If women don't want to get involved they shouldn't be pressured to, so let the DJ know not to say anything to upset the guests. Take a poll before the wedding to see if anyone is really interested in participating and if not, skip it!
To save money on your wedding, you may want to consider making a CD of your favorite songs instead of having a DJ. The price of a DJ can really hurt your pockets and picking out the songs that you and your spouse like can make your day more personal.
Ask your friends, family, and co-workers to find out what skills they have that can help you with your wedding. For example, your best friend might have worked as a florist and a cake decorator, one cousin could be a DJ and the other a photographer, and maybe your Grandmother is willing and able to do all the catering!
Ask your friends, family, and co-workers to find out what skills they have that can help you with your wedding. For example, your best friend might have worked as a florist and a cake decorator, one cousin could be a DJ and the other a photographer, and maybe your Grandmother is willing and able to do all the catering!
If you are going to have a DJ at your wedding, ask to see them in action before the big day. You do not want to be stuck with an inexperienced or unskilled DJ whose lack of musical abilities could ruin the whole atmosphere of your wedding reception. Ask to watch them work at another event first.
Wedding dj mc Melbourne
Discuss sponsorship with vendors who will be servicing your wedding. Many vendors will reduce costs if you allow them to do small things such as their name on the place cards for tables, listing them in the wedding program or perhaps a mention during the reception festivities by the DJ. These small savings can add up quickly.
You always want to do your homework about any vendors you will be hiring for your wedding and that is especially true when it comes to the music. Check references before you hire. When you make your choice, it is important they know of the wedding date and that you both sign the contract. These steps can help you avoid having your wedding ruined.
Hire only the wedding services that are absolutely necessary. You probably do not need to have a wedding planner to assist you; an organized friend or family member who wants to help can do a great job instead. Similarly, you could also hire a DJ instead of an expensive band. Think about what is important to you and go from there.
You have just read a lot of tips on weddings. If you know what you are doing, it will make executing that perfect day alot easier. Remember to stay calm and not to overreact about the little things. Usually things work out for the best, and your wedding day won't be an exception!
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